Ancient Astronomers

Many historians are astounded at the astronomical capabilities of the ancients. Far from being uncultured primitives, they had keen minds and calculating vision. But that should have been obvious from the start. Anyone who can create fire and the wheel from nothing must have a brain cell or two working. In the modern technological world, there are few quantum leaps anymore, just gradual improvement by gradual increment over what already exists.

So why their obsession with the heavens? Many today believe that the celestial creator resides in heaven… could it be the same heaven in which the ancients pictured their own gods? And is there a difference from their religion and the modern forms?

Immanuel Velikovsky wrote in 1950’s Worlds in Collision that the ancients had actually witnessed celestial phenomena which science today says is impossible. By impossible, they mean it does not fall into line with their currently accepted theories.

The planets – gods to the ancients, a practice that continued even into the enlightened ages of the Greeks and Romans – used to exhibit independent behaviors. The ancients claim they had formerly been in their fixed orbits but then went free of them, going wherever they wanted.

This independence of motion came to mean divinity to our ancestors. The planets seemed to exhibit intelligence and volition.

So much of the corpus of ancient writings, myths, and religions hinge on this work of the ancient astronomers, keeping track of the motions of these gods, their battles between each other, and the timetables for their returns.

And the ancients understood that the planets were large spheres, not merely points of light in the night sky.

The question that remains is why did they see a completely different universe than we currently see? Have the rules of celestial behavior changed in so short a time or were the ancients simply dipping into the funny mushrooms a little too much?

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