Introduction to the Mayan Calendar

I suppose I ought to make a few introductory remarks for those people new to this field (or phenomenon) and want to know more about it, I will give a short introduction to the subject. Those wishing more in depth information can find a wealth of articles on the web through any search engine or at practically any bookstore.

The Maya civilization crept into history around 300 BC and peaked between 400 and 800 AD, then quietly slipped back into the jungles around 900-950 AD. But the Maya continued and still exist today predominantly in Guatemala and Southern Mexico. And, believe it or not, they still use the calendar.

Sort of.

You see, the Mayans had several different calendars: the Haab (a solar calendar of 365 days), the Tzolkin (another calendar of 260 days), The Calendar Round (the confluence of both of the former, ending in unison every 52 years), and the Long Count, which is the ONLY calendar that really comes into focus here. None of the other calendars are ending any time soon, just the Long Count.

The Long Count began on August 13, 3114 BC and will end on December 21st, 2012. Why it started on the date mentioned is not really understood by the scholars as many state it had to do with the birth of Venus (whatever that means) and others really have no clue. What the end date signifies… Well, that’s what the fuss is all about currently.

As I stated in the last entry, there are not a lot of differing theories out there about the End-Date. It’s all either Doom-and-Gloom or Golden Enlightenment. If votes were counted, mine would be for the Enlightenment scenario; it sounds a lot more pleasant than the other.

But we shall have to wait until the End-Date arrives to know for certain – if even then, hmmm?

On another note, I will be interviewed on blogtalkradio this Friday evening, 7pm EST. I imagine there will be a short talk and then an open discussion on the subject.

Everyone is invited to attend.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/MisspentYouth.

I hope to see you there.

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